No family history of breast cancer? You could still be at risk.
For 75 percent of women diagnosed with the disease, there was no family history of it. We still don’t know what exactly causes breast cancer, and while genetics may play a role, they don’t tell the whole story.

Secondhand smoke may increase your risk of breast cancer.
A recent study of over 500 women showed that those exposed to secondhand smoke on a regular basis were three times more likely to develop breast cancer than those who avoided cigarette fumes. More research is needed to draw solid conclusions about a possible link between secondhand smoke and breast cancer risk—but the possible connection is one more reason to avoid smoky situations.

You can get breast cancer in your armpits.
As well as in the tissue around you collarbone. This is because breast tissue is also found in these areas. So, when doing your monthly self-exam, make sure to check more than just your breasts!

Men can get breast cancer too. It is extremely rare—less than one percent of all breast cancer occurs in men—but it does happen. However, women are 100 times more likely to develop the disease.

Early detection saves lives. According to the American Cancer Society, when breast cancer is detected and treated during stage one there is a 98 percent survival rate. Which is even more reason to stay abreast of your monthly self-exams and yearly mammograms.